Reevy Hill Primary School

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Y5 Reading

Reading: Age 9–10 (Year 5)

In Year 5, your child will be encouraged to read widely. This way, they will become familiar with many different types of language and writing. They will talk about and explore their understanding of a wide range of books including stories, non-fiction, poetry, and play-scripts.

How to help at home

There are plenty of simple and effective ways you can help your child with reading in Year 5. Here are some top tips.

Keep reading to your child as long as possible

At this age, it is tempting to leave your child to get on with reading on their own. But hearing a story read to them is still very important for developing their comprehension. Here are a few reasons why:

  • Hearing a story read out loud means that your child can have access to books that may as yet be too challenging to read alone. These challenging texts will help to develop their comprehension skills.
  • Left to their own devices, your child might tend to pick lots of similar texts to read (for example, books from a favourite author or magazine). Reading aloud to your child gives you the opportunity to introduce them to books that they might not choose to pick up themselves, exposing them to a wider range of stories and types of text.
  • Listening to an adult read gives a model for fluent reading. It allows your child to hear how a skilled reader uses expression, bringing the words on the page to life.
  • Reading together gives your child time to discuss ideas and share opinions about what you’re reading. This is great, as it helps children to think deeply about a text and practise explaining their opinions.

    Listen to your child read

    Even though your child is likely to be an independent reader by Year 5, it’s still helpful to listen to them read. It means you can help them with unfamiliar words and talk together to make sure that they understand the book.

    Read a wide variety of books

    Encourage your child to choose texts with a variety of formats and layouts. Lots of children have favourite authors and genres, but it can be helpful to expand into new types of books every so often – and be sure not to neglect non-fiction texts, such as magazine articles, brochures, adverts, newspaper columns, signs, and notices.

    Showing your child lots of kinds of texts will give them experience reading in a real-world context, and will also prepare them for national assessments where they are expected to engage with a wide variety of text types. Make sure you talk together about how the texts are presented – the writing will look different depending on what type of text it is from.

Week 1

Work to be done is in the pack sent home. See overview for detail.

Answer sheets for day 1- 3 of week 1
Week 2 

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